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Oxygene! - DiGiCo Supplies Oxygene

Kanta - Wed Feb 27, 2008 8:44 pm
Post subject: DiGiCo Supplies Oxygene
DiGiCo Supplies Oxygene



He’s played live to a record breaking 3.5 million people in Moscow. Two billion people tuned in to see him bring in the new Millennium with the great pyramids as a backdrop. But to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Oxygene, Jean Michel Jarre has gone intimate, and, to help him get the most out of his retro instruments, his Front of House engineer, Alain Courieux, is using a DiGiCo D5 Live digital mixing console.

In November 2007, Jean Michel Jarre released a special anniversary live version of his classic album, Oxygene. The celebration continues this year as Jarre has planned some very special concerts – including the Royal Albert Hall on March 30th – in which he’ll be performing Oxygene in its entirety. The French composer, performer and producer has only ever played excerpts in concert, never the whole piece.

“I decided to do this because when I first recorded Oxygene, I more or less did it in my kitchen – the first ever home studio,” says Jean Michel Jarre. “I was recording on a very, very old eight-track tape recorder at the time. Each time I looked at the machine, I would say to myself that one day I should record this piece of music properly.

“Then, with the evolution of technology and the explosion of high definition for television and audio five years ago, I decided that it was time. I got out the old vintage synthesisers, and was absolutely amazed by the sound and the quality of those instruments that we almost all forgot about somewhere in the Eighties. They have such a special texture, such a special colour. They really are collector items, the equivalent of the Telecaster or the Les Paul Gibson of the sixties, or the Stradivarius for classic music. They are part of the mythology of electronic music.”

Jean Michel Jarre has decided to put these 50 or 60 crazy instruments on stage and perform Oxygene like it is a futuristic classical concert, but in truly classical venues. These venues are quite unusual for him as they are small, with between 1,000 to 3,000 seats. Very far removed from the millions of people he is used to performing to. “For that, we need a very special sound because these very warm analogue machines are like old ladies, and we need accurate and sophisticated equipment to get the right sound in the unusual venues for this type of music.”

To get this sound, a DiGiCo D5 Live console was chosen. The D5 Live digital mixing system sets a completely new standard for live sound mixing. Its audio quality, convenience, simple and intuitive operation are a world apart from conventional mixing. This complete, self-contained system does away with the need for a multicore, splitters, line drivers, dynamics processors and an entire effects rack.

Alain Courieux, who has more than 30 years experience in live sound engineering, studio recording, sound design and audio consultant, is Jean Michel Jarre’s sound engineer on this tour and a great proponent of DiGiCo consoles. “I used a lot of the internal effects contained in the console,” says Courieux. “So the external effects rack consisted of just a Lexicon 480L reverb and an SSL stereo compressor.”

Virtually every feature is there to see at a glance, or at most a single, logical fingertip press away. The four LCD touch screens present their facilities exactly as you'd expect to find them on an advanced analogue console, with instant access and a refreshing lack of menus to navigate. Packed in to the desk are powerful digital dynamics, an effects package, total recall of every function, a 38x8 output matrix, up to 128 input channel s and 40 multi-configurable internal buses.

“I’m really glad to work with DiGiCo and this fantastic equipment that they provide,” continues Jarre. “I think that the timeless warmth and the texture of the old analogue instruments teamed with the up to date digital sound technology is great. Not only for the PA systems, but also to eventually record the whole piece for film and for live projects. It’s absolutely ideal and we are delighted with it. I’m sure that the D5 is going to perform very well. To match this on stage is my next plan”.

Courieux is looking forward to the rest of the tour that kicks off in March. “The tour will see us use two DiGiCo D5 consoles, and the monitors and in ear system will be driven with a CS-D5,” Courieux added.

http://www.digico.org

Source.

Please do not take this link elsewhere unless you credit the person who found it. :P 8) :kanta: :mrgreen:

Jakob BC - Wed Feb 27, 2008 8:53 pm

Thanks Kanta 8)
Kanta - Wed Feb 27, 2008 8:57 pm

You're welcome, Jakob. :D It's a nice read and I of course, especially like the pic. :nod:
Robi - Wed Feb 27, 2008 9:01 pm

Great, thanks Kanta !!

I guess photo was taken in Jarre studio... :roll:

Christophe - Wed Feb 27, 2008 9:51 pm

Dänke for the info, dear Kanta! 8) :wink:

Greetzzz...

Kanta - Wed Feb 27, 2008 10:45 pm

You both very welcome, Robi and Christophe. :D

Robi wrote:
I guess photo was taken in Jarre studio... :roll:

The pic was taken in JMJ's studio. The lamp in the pic is very similar to the one you can see in The Making of Téo & Téa, where he speaks inside his studio. :wink:

Nico_Noyau - Thu Feb 28, 2008 12:32 am

Damn, Kanta, you are marvellous, many thanks :D
Jon - Thu Feb 28, 2008 10:16 am

Great find and thank you's for posting it up Kanta :peacemaan:
Dark Shrimp - Thu Feb 28, 2008 10:45 am

Thank you Kanta ! 8)

Good beast on the picture ( for the gear ... :roll: :mrgreen: ) !

Kanta - Thu Feb 28, 2008 11:15 am

Oh my dears, thank you for your thanks. :kanta: :grouphug: :mrgreen:
Dr_Jones - Thu Feb 28, 2008 1:35 pm

Where's the picture on the interwebs site? I've been looking for the article, but can't find it.

But again, great find!

Kanta - Thu Feb 28, 2008 4:45 pm

Dr_Jones wrote:
Where's the picture on the interwebs site? I've been looking for the article, but can't find it.

Hmmm :no: , I couldn’t find anything either. On DiGiCo’s official website I could only find this which is a press release, dated 9 December 2002 :| and mentions very briefly JMJ’s name. Maybe, they have just not got round to updating their website atm. :wink:

Dr_Jones wrote:
But again, great find!

Thanxs Coen. :D

rob9382 - Fri Feb 29, 2008 12:44 am

thanks kanta :)
Kanta - Fri Feb 29, 2008 10:22 pm

My pleasure. :wink:
GeeJee - Tue Mar 11, 2008 12:32 am

Spanktastic. 8)
FabiettoCAT - Tue Mar 18, 2008 1:57 am

Directly from the DiGiCo website, the original Press Release with HQ photos.
Then, by clicking the red link, a video presentation of the LIYLR work and the DiGiCo D5 Live consoles made by Jarre himself (not really new words for us here... :mrgreen: )!

Robi - Tue Mar 18, 2008 8:34 am

thanks!! :D
Kanta - Tue Mar 18, 2008 10:27 am

Merci FabiettoCAT. :D So, they finally decided to update their site. Great video and :pics: . 8)
Robi - Tue Mar 18, 2008 4:34 pm

I wonder what does the guy in the background edit / see / or cut ?
JeromeTV - Tue Mar 18, 2008 5:56 pm

Robi wrote:
I wonder what does the guy in the background edit / see / or cut ?


he sees French TV... looks like France2 :D

FabiettoCAT - Tue Mar 18, 2008 10:30 pm

You're welcome! :wink2:

[OT] On the TV screen you can see one of the strongest women ever: Ingrid Betancourt.
I hope she's going well and they will release her soon... :plz:
World needs people like her! [/OT]

Ciao!
Fabio

Kanta - Tue Mar 18, 2008 10:47 pm

I have not watched the TV screen. :no: Maybe, next time. :wink2:
FabiettoCAT - Tue Apr 15, 2008 9:55 pm

FabiettoCAT wrote:
You're welcome! :wink2:

[OT] On the TV screen you can see one of the strongest women ever: Ingrid Betancourt.
I hope she's going well and they will release her soon... :plz:
World needs people like her! [/OT]

Ciao!
Fabio


I quote myself! (And sorry to be a bit OT...!)
This is a videomessage from JMJ, dated december 2007, to sustain Ingrid Betancourt.
(Thanks to French AeroZone Forum)

SAP - Tue Apr 15, 2008 11:00 pm

Very nice! Thanks. Love the pics.
rembrown - Tue Aug 18, 2009 10:11 pm
Post subject: Re: DiGiCo Supplies Oxygene
Kanta wrote:
DiGiCo Supplies Oxygene

Image

He’s played live to a record breaking 3.5 million people in Moscow. Two billion people tuned in to see him bring in the new Millennium with the great pyramids as a backdrop. But to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Oxygene, Jean Michel Jarre has gone intimate, and, to help him get the most out of his retro instruments, his Front of House engineer, Alain Courieux, is using a DiGiCo D5 Live digital mixing console.

In November 2007, Jean Michel Jarre released a special anniversary live version of his classic album, Oxygene. The celebration continues this year as Jarre has planned some very special concerts – including the Royal Albert Hall on March 30th – in which he’ll be performing Oxygene in its entirety. The French composer, performer and producer has only ever played excerpts in concert, never the whole piece.

“I decided to do this because when I first recorded Oxygene, I more or less did it in my kitchen – the first ever home studio,” says Jean Michel Jarre. “I was recording on a very, very old eight-track tape recorder at the time. Each time I looked at the machine, I would say to myself that one day I should record this piece of music properly.

“Then, with the evolution of technology and the explosion of high definition for television and audio five years ago, I decided that it was time. I got out the old vintage synthesisers, and was absolutely amazed by the sound and the quality of those instruments that we almost all forgot about somewhere in the Eighties. They have such a special texture, such a special colour. They really are collector items, the equivalent of the Telecaster or the Les Paul Gibson of the sixties, or the Stradivarius for classic music. They are part of the mythology of electronic music.”

Jean Michel Jarre has decided to put these 50 or 60 crazy instruments on stage and perform Oxygene like it is a futuristic classical concert, but in truly classical venues. These venues are quite unusual for him as they are small, with between 1,000 to 3,000 seats. Very far removed from the millions of people he is used to performing to. “For that, we need a very special sound because these very warm analogue machines are like old ladies, and we need accurate and sophisticated equipment to get the right sound in the unusual venues for this type of music.”

To get this sound, a DiGiCo D5 Live console was chosen. The D5 Live digital mixing system sets a completely new standard for live sound mixing. Its audio quality, convenience, simple and intuitive operation are a world apart from conventional mixing. This complete, self-contained system does away with the need for a multicore, splitters, line drivers, dynamics processors and an entire effects rack.

Alain Courieux, who has more than 30 years experience in live sound engineering, studio recording, sound design and audio consultant, is Jean Michel Jarre’s sound engineer on this tour and a great proponent of DiGiCo consoles. “I used a lot of the internal effects contained in the console,” says Courieux. “So the external effects rack consisted of just a Lexicon 480L reverb and an SSL stereo compressor.”

Virtually every feature is there to see at a glance, or at most a single, logical fingertip press away. The four LCD touch screens present their facilities exactly as you'd expect to find them on an advanced analogue console, with instant access and a refreshing lack of menus to navigate. Packed in to the desk are powerful digital dynamics, an effects package, total recall of every function, a 38x8 output matrix, up to 128 input channel s and 40 multi-configurable internal buses.

“I’m really glad to work with DiGiCo and this fantastic equipment that they provide,” continues Jarre. “I think that the timeless warmth and the texture of the old analogue instruments teamed with the up to date digital sound technology is great. Not only for the PA systems, but also to eventually record the whole piece for film and for live projects. It’s absolutely ideal and we are delighted with it. I’m sure that the D5 is going to perform very well. To match this on stage is my next plan”.

Courieux is looking forward to the rest of the tour that kicks off in March. “The tour will see us use two DiGiCo D5 consoles, and the monitors and in ear system will be driven with a CS-D5,” Courieux added.

http://www.digico.org

Source.

Please do not take this link elsewhere unless you credit the person who found it. :P 8) :kanta: :mrgreen:


Ok, one thing Jarre got ANALOG SYNTHS on stage but they used a digital mixing console. That's really strange 'cause if you want to bring the analog sound to the people you have to do everything analog. That's always the best, if you have a vision like jarre's. That's the same way that they used the Protools HD3 system to record the Live in your living room DVD. It's not analog so you have always to do with samples which aren't fluent.

GeeJee - Tue Aug 18, 2009 10:20 pm

Erm.
I'm afraid you don't really know what you're talking about.

Jarp2600 - Tue Aug 18, 2009 11:54 pm

Good choise, I like working with those D5's/D7's! :)
Especially for a concert of a perfectionist like Jarre, working with such a console is ideal, since you can save each track's settings. When you are on tour with a band, that makes things a lot easier.
Downside of the console is, that due to the big screens and graphic displaying of every setting you change, that you sometimes start mixing with your eyes, instead of with your ears without noticing...

@ Rembrown: Don't judge things you don't know too much about.

Kanta - Wed Aug 19, 2009 11:38 am

Thanxs for your input, Jarp. :D

It's better knowing first hand then reading it from an article. Sometimes, articles don't get down to basics. :P

rembrown - Wed Aug 19, 2009 3:26 pm

Jarp2600 wrote:
Good choise, I like working with those D5's/D7's! :)
Especially for a concert of a perfectionist like Jarre, working with such a console is ideal, since you can save each track's settings. When you are on tour with a band, that makes things a lot easier.
Downside of the console is, that due to the big screens and graphic displaying of every setting you change, that you sometimes start mixing with your eyes, instead of with your ears without noticing...

@ Rembrown: Don't judge things you don't know too much about.


Uhm Sorry I'm in this business I know what i'm talking about. But i didn't say that the D series are bad, even there quiet good. I like working with these things too. I'm talking about the analog vision of Jarre and that I don't understand that he used a digital Mixing console to bring the analog synth sound to the people.

Jarp2600 - Wed Aug 19, 2009 4:04 pm

rembrown wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
Good choise, I like working with those D5's/D7's! :)
Especially for a concert of a perfectionist like Jarre, working with such a console is ideal, since you can save each track's settings. When you are on tour with a band, that makes things a lot easier.
Downside of the console is, that due to the big screens and graphic displaying of every setting you change, that you sometimes start mixing with your eyes, instead of with your ears without noticing...

@ Rembrown: Don't judge things you don't know too much about.


Uhm Sorry I'm in this business I know what i'm talking about. But i didn't say that the D series are bad, even there quiet good. I like working with these things too. I'm talking about the analog vision of Jarre and that I don't understand that he used a digital Mixing console to bring the analog synth sound to the people.


No, you don't, otherwise you wouldn't say such things. The 96/24 converters and 32bit float processing of a hi-quality digital console (console, not 'thing') like a DigiCo or M7CL or sth, will probably display the 'analog sound' of JMJ's synths ways more transparent than a standard Midas console. To come close to JMJ's audio wishes, you'll need some SSL/NEVE/Fairlight console or sth.
Second, I don't know if you have ever FoH'ed an electronic music show, but I guess you should try doing one with an analog console. Then you'll rather quickly discover the advances of a digital mixing console, I guess. Good luck with changing the routing, EQ and insert/send settings after each song! :D

rembrown - Wed Aug 19, 2009 4:44 pm

Jarp2600 wrote:
rembrown wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
Good choise, I like working with those D5's/D7's! :)
Especially for a concert of a perfectionist like Jarre, working with such a console is ideal, since you can save each track's settings. When you are on tour with a band, that makes things a lot easier.
Downside of the console is, that due to the big screens and graphic displaying of every setting you change, that you sometimes start mixing with your eyes, instead of with your ears without noticing...

@ Rembrown: Don't judge things you don't know too much about.


Uhm Sorry I'm in this business I know what i'm talking about. But i didn't say that the D series are bad, even there quiet good. I like working with these things too. I'm talking about the analog vision of Jarre and that I don't understand that he used a digital Mixing console to bring the analog synth sound to the people.


No, you don't, otherwise you wouldn't say such things. The 96/24 converters and 32bit float processing of a hi-quality digital console (console, not 'thing') like a DigiCo or M7CL or sth, will probably display the 'analog sound' of JMJ's synths ways more transparent than a standard Midas console. To come close to JMJ's audio wishes, you'll need some SSL/NEVE/Fairlight console or sth.
Second, I don't know if you have ever FoH'ed an electronic music show, but I guess you should try doing one with an analog console. Then you'll rather quickly discover the advances of a digital mixing console, I guess. Good luck with changing the routing, EQ and insert/send settings after each song! :D


I know that the quality of the digital "consoles" are that high these days and that it sounds almost analog. But then still it is not analog so you never have that analog feel that you have in an analog mixing console. And i know the routing systems and all the effects incl. the EQ are much easier use in a digital console, still you haven't that analog feel that you have with an analog mixing console. But anyway, I didn't say that it was a bad choice.

But ok, let's go ontopic again.

Jarp2600 - Wed Aug 19, 2009 4:50 pm

rembrown wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
rembrown wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
Good choise, I like working with those D5's/D7's! :)
Especially for a concert of a perfectionist like Jarre, working with such a console is ideal, since you can save each track's settings. When you are on tour with a band, that makes things a lot easier.
Downside of the console is, that due to the big screens and graphic displaying of every setting you change, that you sometimes start mixing with your eyes, instead of with your ears without noticing...

@ Rembrown: Don't judge things you don't know too much about.


Uhm Sorry I'm in this business I know what i'm talking about. But i didn't say that the D series are bad, even there quiet good. I like working with these things too. I'm talking about the analog vision of Jarre and that I don't understand that he used a digital Mixing console to bring the analog synth sound to the people.


No, you don't, otherwise you wouldn't say such things. The 96/24 converters and 32bit float processing of a hi-quality digital console (console, not 'thing') like a DigiCo or M7CL or sth, will probably display the 'analog sound' of JMJ's synths ways more transparent than a standard Midas console. To come close to JMJ's audio wishes, you'll need some SSL/NEVE/Fairlight console or sth.
Second, I don't know if you have ever FoH'ed an electronic music show, but I guess you should try doing one with an analog console. Then you'll rather quickly discover the advances of a digital mixing console, I guess. Good luck with changing the routing, EQ and insert/send settings after each song! :D


I know that the quality of the digital "consoles" are that high these days and that it sounds almost analog. But then still it is not analog so you never have that analog feel that you have in an analog mixing console. And i know the routing systems and all the effects incl. the EQ are much easier use in a digital console, still you haven't that analog feel that you have with an analog mixing console. But anyway, I didn't say that it was a bad choice.

But ok, let's go ontopic again.


I wonder if you would hear the difference. :wink:

GeeJee - Wed Aug 19, 2009 8:14 pm

rembrown wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
Good choise, I like working with those D5's/D7's! :)
Especially for a concert of a perfectionist like Jarre, working with such a console is ideal, since you can save each track's settings. When you are on tour with a band, that makes things a lot easier.
Downside of the console is, that due to the big screens and graphic displaying of every setting you change, that you sometimes start mixing with your eyes, instead of with your ears without noticing...

@ Rembrown: Don't judge things you don't know too much about.


Uhm Sorry I'm in this business I know what i'm talking about. But i didn't say that the D series are bad, even there quiet good. I like working with these things too. I'm talking about the analog vision of Jarre and that I don't understand that he used a digital Mixing console to bring the analog synth sound to the people.


Analog synths have their own sound, and that's why JMJ brings them on stage, agreed?
If he would use an analog console, it wouldn't be practical, like Jarp pointed out, but also it would color the sound like hell. I understand you think that analog console would add extra warmth (it might, but there's plenty of it already)- but if you want to preserve the original warm sound of these old ladies, you take either a console with ultra-high quality D/A convertors (are they 96/24, Jarp? I know he used 192/24 for the LIYLR album) or STFU :D

rembrown - Wed Aug 19, 2009 11:05 pm

GeeJee wrote:
rembrown wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
Good choise, I like working with those D5's/D7's! :)
Especially for a concert of a perfectionist like Jarre, working with such a console is ideal, since you can save each track's settings. When you are on tour with a band, that makes things a lot easier.
Downside of the console is, that due to the big screens and graphic displaying of every setting you change, that you sometimes start mixing with your eyes, instead of with your ears without noticing...

@ Rembrown: Don't judge things you don't know too much about.


Uhm Sorry I'm in this business I know what i'm talking about. But i didn't say that the D series are bad, even there quiet good. I like working with these things too. I'm talking about the analog vision of Jarre and that I don't understand that he used a digital Mixing console to bring the analog synth sound to the people.


Analog synths have their own sound, and that's why JMJ brings them on stage, agreed?
If he would use an analog console, it wouldn't be practical, like Jarp pointed out, but also it would color the sound like hell. I understand you think that analog console would add extra warmth (it might, but there's plenty of it already)- but if you want to preserve the original warm sound of these old ladies, you take either a console with ultra-high quality D/A convertors (are they 96/24, Jarp? I know he used 192/24 for the LIYLR album) or STFU :D


You/Jarp got a point there about the warmth. BTW the D5 Live have a 96/24 AD-DA converter.

Jarp2600 - Thu Aug 20, 2009 12:42 am

GeeJee wrote:
rembrown wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
Good choise, I like working with those D5's/D7's! :)
Especially for a concert of a perfectionist like Jarre, working with such a console is ideal, since you can save each track's settings. When you are on tour with a band, that makes things a lot easier.
Downside of the console is, that due to the big screens and graphic displaying of every setting you change, that you sometimes start mixing with your eyes, instead of with your ears without noticing...

@ Rembrown: Don't judge things you don't know too much about.


Uhm Sorry I'm in this business I know what i'm talking about. But i didn't say that the D series are bad, even there quiet good. I like working with these things too. I'm talking about the analog vision of Jarre and that I don't understand that he used a digital Mixing console to bring the analog synth sound to the people.



Analog synths have their own sound, and that's why JMJ brings them on stage, agreed?
If he would use an analog console, it wouldn't be practical, like Jarp pointed out, but also it would color the sound like hell. I understand you think that analog console would add extra warmth (it might, but there's plenty of it already)- but if you want to preserve the original warm sound of these old ladies, you take either a console with ultra-high quality D/A convertors (are they 96/24, Jarp? I know he used 192/24 for the LIYLR album) or STFU :D

D5 is standard 44.1 and 48. 96khz is optional, I never heard of a 192 clock capability for those... So I guess Courieux used the 96 one.
Could it be that you mixed it up with the PT HD system? Those are indeed in 192/24. :)
Btw, the difference between 96k and 192k is practically not to hear. Since the human ear can only registrate up to 20khz (perhaps 30, for the people who say 'sensing' ultrasone sound), so the different Nyquist frequencies between 48 and 96 kHz won't really make sense imho... :)

GeeJee - Thu Aug 20, 2009 1:40 am

Jarp2600 wrote:
GeeJee wrote:
rembrown wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
Good choise, I like working with those D5's/D7's! :)
Especially for a concert of a perfectionist like Jarre, working with such a console is ideal, since you can save each track's settings. When you are on tour with a band, that makes things a lot easier.
Downside of the console is, that due to the big screens and graphic displaying of every setting you change, that you sometimes start mixing with your eyes, instead of with your ears without noticing...

@ Rembrown: Don't judge things you don't know too much about.


Uhm Sorry I'm in this business I know what i'm talking about. But i didn't say that the D series are bad, even there quiet good. I like working with these things too. I'm talking about the analog vision of Jarre and that I don't understand that he used a digital Mixing console to bring the analog synth sound to the people.



Analog synths have their own sound, and that's why JMJ brings them on stage, agreed?
If he would use an analog console, it wouldn't be practical, like Jarp pointed out, but also it would color the sound like hell. I understand you think that analog console would add extra warmth (it might, but there's plenty of it already)- but if you want to preserve the original warm sound of these old ladies, you take either a console with ultra-high quality D/A convertors (are they 96/24, Jarp? I know he used 192/24 for the LIYLR album) or STFU :D

D5 is standard 44.1 and 48. 96khz is optional, I never heard of a 192 clock capability for those... So I guess Courieux used the 96 one.
Could it be that you mixed it up with the PT HD system? Those are indeed in 192/24. :)
Btw, the difference between 96k and 192k is practically not to hear. Since the human ear can only registrate up to 20khz (perhaps 30, for the people who say 'sensing' ultrasone sound), so the different Nyquist frequencies between 48 and 96 kHz won't really make sense imho... :)


True, but since you want to capture the character of the analog instruments, your resolution can't be high enough. :D

As for the studio recording, yes I was referring to PT HD ;)

rembrown - Thu Aug 20, 2009 10:23 am

GeeJee wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
GeeJee wrote:
rembrown wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
Good choise, I like working with those D5's/D7's! :)
Especially for a concert of a perfectionist like Jarre, working with such a console is ideal, since you can save each track's settings. When you are on tour with a band, that makes things a lot easier.
Downside of the console is, that due to the big screens and graphic displaying of every setting you change, that you sometimes start mixing with your eyes, instead of with your ears without noticing...

@ Rembrown: Don't judge things you don't know too much about.


Uhm Sorry I'm in this business I know what i'm talking about. But i didn't say that the D series are bad, even there quiet good. I like working with these things too. I'm talking about the analog vision of Jarre and that I don't understand that he used a digital Mixing console to bring the analog synth sound to the people.



Analog synths have their own sound, and that's why JMJ brings them on stage, agreed?
If he would use an analog console, it wouldn't be practical, like Jarp pointed out, but also it would color the sound like hell. I understand you think that analog console would add extra warmth (it might, but there's plenty of it already)- but if you want to preserve the original warm sound of these old ladies, you take either a console with ultra-high quality D/A convertors (are they 96/24, Jarp? I know he used 192/24 for the LIYLR album) or STFU :D

D5 is standard 44.1 and 48. 96khz is optional, I never heard of a 192 clock capability for those... So I guess Courieux used the 96 one.
Could it be that you mixed it up with the PT HD system? Those are indeed in 192/24. :)
Btw, the difference between 96k and 192k is practically not to hear. Since the human ear can only registrate up to 20khz (perhaps 30, for the people who say 'sensing' ultrasone sound), so the different Nyquist frequencies between 48 and 96 kHz won't really make sense imho... :)


True, but since you want to capture the character of the analog instruments, your resolution can't be high enough. :D

As for the studio recording, yes I was referring to PT HD ;)


I agree with this. BTW Jarre used on PT 96/24 (that's what he said in a interview with SoS).

GeeJee - Thu Aug 20, 2009 12:48 pm

rembrown wrote:
GeeJee wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
GeeJee wrote:
rembrown wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
Good choise, I like working with those D5's/D7's! :)
Especially for a concert of a perfectionist like Jarre, working with such a console is ideal, since you can save each track's settings. When you are on tour with a band, that makes things a lot easier.
Downside of the console is, that due to the big screens and graphic displaying of every setting you change, that you sometimes start mixing with your eyes, instead of with your ears without noticing...

@ Rembrown: Don't judge things you don't know too much about.


Uhm Sorry I'm in this business I know what i'm talking about. But i didn't say that the D series are bad, even there quiet good. I like working with these things too. I'm talking about the analog vision of Jarre and that I don't understand that he used a digital Mixing console to bring the analog synth sound to the people.



Analog synths have their own sound, and that's why JMJ brings them on stage, agreed?
If he would use an analog console, it wouldn't be practical, like Jarp pointed out, but also it would color the sound like hell. I understand you think that analog console would add extra warmth (it might, but there's plenty of it already)- but if you want to preserve the original warm sound of these old ladies, you take either a console with ultra-high quality D/A convertors (are they 96/24, Jarp? I know he used 192/24 for the LIYLR album) or STFU :D

D5 is standard 44.1 and 48. 96khz is optional, I never heard of a 192 clock capability for those... So I guess Courieux used the 96 one.
Could it be that you mixed it up with the PT HD system? Those are indeed in 192/24. :)
Btw, the difference between 96k and 192k is practically not to hear. Since the human ear can only registrate up to 20khz (perhaps 30, for the people who say 'sensing' ultrasone sound), so the different Nyquist frequencies between 48 and 96 kHz won't really make sense imho... :)


True, but since you want to capture the character of the analog instruments, your resolution can't be high enough. :D

As for the studio recording, yes I was referring to PT HD ;)


I agree with this. BTW Jarre used on PT 96/24 (that's what he said in a interview with SoS).


But his studio technician told me otherwise. :nod:

rembrown - Thu Aug 20, 2009 12:59 pm

GeeJee wrote:
rembrown wrote:
GeeJee wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
GeeJee wrote:
rembrown wrote:
Jarp2600 wrote:
Good choise, I like working with those D5's/D7's! :)
Especially for a concert of a perfectionist like Jarre, working with such a console is ideal, since you can save each track's settings. When you are on tour with a band, that makes things a lot easier.
Downside of the console is, that due to the big screens and graphic displaying of every setting you change, that you sometimes start mixing with your eyes, instead of with your ears without noticing...

@ Rembrown: Don't judge things you don't know too much about.


Uhm Sorry I'm in this business I know what i'm talking about. But i didn't say that the D series are bad, even there quiet good. I like working with these things too. I'm talking about the analog vision of Jarre and that I don't understand that he used a digital Mixing console to bring the analog synth sound to the people.



Analog synths have their own sound, and that's why JMJ brings them on stage, agreed?
If he would use an analog console, it wouldn't be practical, like Jarp pointed out, but also it would color the sound like hell. I understand you think that analog console would add extra warmth (it might, but there's plenty of it already)- but if you want to preserve the original warm sound of these old ladies, you take either a console with ultra-high quality D/A convertors (are they 96/24, Jarp? I know he used 192/24 for the LIYLR album) or STFU :D

D5 is standard 44.1 and 48. 96khz is optional, I never heard of a 192 clock capability for those... So I guess Courieux used the 96 one.
Could it be that you mixed it up with the PT HD system? Those are indeed in 192/24. :)
Btw, the difference between 96k and 192k is practically not to hear. Since the human ear can only registrate up to 20khz (perhaps 30, for the people who say 'sensing' ultrasone sound), so the different Nyquist frequencies between 48 and 96 kHz won't really make sense imho... :)


True, but since you want to capture the character of the analog instruments, your resolution can't be high enough. :D

As for the studio recording, yes I was referring to PT HD ;)


I agree with this. BTW Jarre used on PT 96/24 (that's what he said in a interview with SoS).


But his studio technician told me otherwise. :nod:


Ok that's strange? 'cause on the DVD label there standing that it was recorded with 96/24 (that's what i remember).


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