Welcome to the new BlahBlahCafe!

Having trouble registering? You can contact us at the "Contact us" link at the bottom of the page.

Oxymore album, october 21 2022


Post Posted Sun Oct 02, 2022 8:55 am
plate of chips


Posts: 266
Likes received  : 10

Kanta wrote: Fri Sep 30, 2022 8:19 pm Image

The collaborative remix is set to release on Jarre's 22nd studio album, "OXYMORE" in October 2022.

Source: https://edm.com/music-releases/jean-mic ... sm-reprise
I have a hunch that Deathpact is JmJ and or JmJ with another Electronic musician.
The giveaway for me was that the first Deathpact video was in VR Notre-Dame similar time as JmJ did his VR Notre-Dame performance.
Post Posted Sun Oct 02, 2022 11:05 am
Finaero


User avatar
Posts: 2879
Location: Finland
Likes given: 123
Likes received  : 39

I don't dislike that remix (at least it's got more to do with the original track than the infamous PSB Liberation remixes, for example), but it certainly does start with sounds similar to mine in the lavatory earlier today ;)
Post Posted Sun Oct 02, 2022 9:56 pm
Dr_Jones


User avatar
Posts: 3206
Location: Leiden, Netherlands
Likes given: 109
Likes received  : 208

plate of chips wrote: Sun Oct 02, 2022 8:55 am I have a hunch that Deathpact is JmJ and or JmJ with another Electronic musician.
The giveaway for me was that the first Deathpact video was in VR Notre-Dame similar time as JmJ did his VR Notre-Dame performance.
I always thought Deathpact was American. All of his concerts are USA-based and all.
Post Posted Mon Oct 03, 2022 5:33 pm
Robi83


Posts: 95
Likes given: 2
Likes received  : 7

Perhaps this album proves to be sort of an Electronica 3...considering the collaborations.

Thoughts? :)
Post Posted Mon Oct 03, 2022 6:18 pm
Dr_Jones


User avatar
Posts: 3206
Location: Leiden, Netherlands
Likes given: 109
Likes received  : 208

This is an amazing list of remixers, moreso than Jarremix or OtO2 have. If you can fill up a whole album of remixers then you have a quite the album.

The only difference is that the Electronica songs are made as collaboration, remixers are more a one way street where the remixer does their own thing
Post Posted Tue Oct 04, 2022 6:49 am
Kanta
English Moderator & Miss News

User avatar
Posts: 10473
Location: United Kingdom
Likes given: 33
Likes received  : 105

Image

Jean-Michel Jarre Day on France Musique
Friday October 21, 2022, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
in Musique Matin, Musicopolis and Open Jazz
On the occasion of the release of his new album Oxymore (Sony), an immersive work in homage to Pierre Henry, France Musique is devoting part of its antenna to the artist Jean-Michel Jarre on Friday October 21 before Les Grands Entretiens which will be consecrated by the end of the year.

Source: https://www.radiofrance.com/presse/fran ... tobre-2022
Jarregirl YouTube
Concerts attended:
Théâtre Marigny, Paris - 2007
Symphony Hall, Birmingham - 2008
RAH, London - 2008
Wembley Arena, London - 2009
NIA, Birmingham - 2009
POP Bercy, Paris - 2010
NIA, Birmingham - 2010
O2 Arena, London - 2010
Zénith Aréna, Lille - 2010
Port Hercule, Monaco - 2011
TUI Arena, Hannover - 2011
Festival International de Carthage - 2013
Barclaycard Arena, Birmingham - 2016
Post Posted Fri Oct 07, 2022 12:42 pm
Kanta
English Moderator & Miss News

User avatar
Posts: 10473
Location: United Kingdom
Likes given: 33
Likes received  : 105

Image

07/10/2022 via La Repubblica

Jean-Michel Jarre: hope is the metaverse

We went to London to meet the pioneer of electronics and listen to his new record: "In the 60s we thought that 2000 would bring opportunity and justice. An idea that was later wrecked". Will it get better in the future? "Yes, always thanks to hi-tech"

(You might have to subscribe to read the complete interview.)

Source: https://www.repubblica.it/venerdi/2022/ ... 368411670/
Jarregirl YouTube
Concerts attended:
Théâtre Marigny, Paris - 2007
Symphony Hall, Birmingham - 2008
RAH, London - 2008
Wembley Arena, London - 2009
NIA, Birmingham - 2009
POP Bercy, Paris - 2010
NIA, Birmingham - 2010
O2 Arena, London - 2010
Zénith Aréna, Lille - 2010
Port Hercule, Monaco - 2011
TUI Arena, Hannover - 2011
Festival International de Carthage - 2013
Barclaycard Arena, Birmingham - 2016
Post Posted Fri Oct 07, 2022 5:43 pm
Dr_Jones


User avatar
Posts: 3206
Location: Leiden, Netherlands
Likes given: 109
Likes received  : 208

Cool, I found the full article via google (and threw it through Google translate):

Jean-Michel Jarre: hope is the metaverse
123005759-9ecf4479-a75a-4729-a25d-7ed74498db7a.jpg
We went to London to meet the pioneer of electronics and listen to his new record: "In the 60s we thought that 2000 would bring opportunity and justice. An idea that was later wrecked". Will it get better in the future? "Yes, always thanks to hi-tech"
07 October 2022

Updated at 11:01 am 7 min read

LONDON. Solemnity has its grotesque features. The Queen's coffin has arrived in town. The taxi drivers communicate by radio the whereabouts of the body: it is here, not there. They try the opposite direction to get out of the endless traffic jam.

Jean Michel Jarre, meanwhile, is waiting at the L-Acoustics studios, to play his 22nd album, Oxymore, out on 21 October (Sony) at the highest quality. For once, he's not the one to round up Guinness World Record tides. The recent livestream Welcome to the Other Side, inside a virtual Notre-Dame, attracted 75 million viewers. Live, in 1979 in Paris, he made a million people; one and a half in Houston in 1986; three and a half in Moscow in 1997.

First oxymoron for someone who has spent almost more time with machines than with human beings, locked in the studio to be a sound hunter, developing a paralanguage like those who live with whales. They define it as an electronics totem, a monument, in reality it is a mobile installation, always placed one step ahead.
123135920-613c7006-d3d8-4d96-8f03-8fe4a77e6fd9.jpg
(M.Kuenster Monsterpics)

At 75, with 85 million records sold, he has the same curious mind as when as a child, in Lyon, he dropped the microphone in the street to record the din of soldiers and jukeboxes, the echoes of the train, the distant circus, and all the possible sound accidents. He is not commanded by the DNA. Grandfather André was an oboist and inventor of one of the first radio mixers, his father Maurice an Oscar-winning composer (he won them for Passage to India, Doctor Zhivago, Lawrence of Arabia), who soon left his family.

Jeans, jacket and dark glasses, Jarre is exalted for the project that links the past and the future of electronics. It goes from the genesis of electroacoustics - the tribute to the mentor Pierre Henry, to the movement of musique concrète, and to that choreography of uncoded sounds - to the new sound horizon: the multi-channel and 3D binaural used for the first commercial publication of the genre. With headphones, Oxymore is an immersive work where the listener is at the center, surrounded by sounds that walk on the back of the neck like ants. "It is not just a new listening experience, for everyone, not for the sophisticated and privileged" he explains. "It is just another way of composing, putting sound objects in space".

If that wasn't enough, the tracks have remixes (also by Martin Gore and Brian Eno) and come alive in Oxyville: "A virtual metropolis of music where you can play concerts, invite artists and hold masterclasses". It will play to us in avatar format. Oxymore is closer to the experimental Zoolook of 1984 than to that Oxygène of 1976 which with 12 million copies sold brought electronics to the general public, and live the rave matrix "But exactly as then" assures Jarre "we are at beginning of a movement ".

Can you give me your definition of music?
"For me it falls into the category of addictions. It is an unsatisfied search, a mirage you tend to without ever reaching it. What you have in your head and what comes out are two parallel lines that you try to converge. The oxymoron par excellence".

"The era in stereo is over, which is an illusion, a fiction to create the sense of space. In nature we hear at 360 °, the noises come from our side, behind us. The binaural system gives us this three-dimensionality. To reinforce it there is virtual reality, closer to music than to video games because the first sense involved is not sight. It is hearing that perceives total immersion ".

Why the need to set the stages of electronic music today?
"In the album I pay homage to the European approach to modern music and I hand this grammar to the new generation. Electronic music has nothing to do with the America of jazz, blues or rock. And it was not born in Detroit as many people think now, but in our continent, also in Italy, with L'arte dei Rumori by Luigi Russolo, a kind of science fiction writer in music. And in France, at the end of the 1940s, with the Groupe de Recherches Musicales by Pierre Schaeffer and Pierre Henry . They are the first DJs in history. Today's samples, sound design, derive from them. Seminal, and unfortunately not as popular as John Cage ".

The album was conceived on Radio France, where he met them in 1968. How did he get there?
"I studied classical music, I played in a rock band, then I was struck by these alchemist smiths who conceived music not as notes but as sounds. The difference between noise and music was in the composer's intention, in his hands. They mixed elements that apparently they have nothing to do with each other, the sound of rain with a clarinet. Silence? As relevant as the rest. They were surrealists, provocateurs, iconoclasts. I too became a hijacker. "

Were you considered pop among the avant-garde?
"I've always been in a schizophrenic situation. I wasn't intellectual like the others. Pure experimentation was too cerebral for me. I love melody, the sensual element, sharing, so I set myself up as a bridge between experimentation and pop culture. . Yet Oxigène certainly could not be defined as commercial ".

He had to play alien in 1976.
"Nobody wanted to publish it. They said: it has no rhythm, there is no voice, plus you are French. When it came out, people were sending back vinyl, complaining about the noises, the manufacturing defects. Today it is a classic. name we give to what will be popular thirty years later ".

Would Oxymore call it a pop record?
"In the sense that it is a sound experience that everyone can do. There are danceable pieces, delicate parts, others violent, and then, of course, faithfulness to my experimental roots. For example, one day I had the window open and out of nowhere it appeared. the sound of a jazz drummer rehearsing from a distance, lost in space. I captured it and put it in. "

Like a polaroid. On the other hand, for Henry concrete music was closer to photography than to music. He compared his profession to that of a monk. Do you agree?
"The musicians share the stage, they have an orchestra next to them, but the composer is solitary, he looks more like a painter, a writer. The studio is an atelier where he gets sounds and shapes them like a sculptor does with stone".
123122507-1c389022-0bae-4ee0-b25b-518205f869f5.jpg
The cover of Oxymore: will be released with Sony on October 21 on cd, vinyl, digital, in stereo and in binaural audio

In two songs there is the voice, the breath of his mentor. How much is there?
"We were supposed to work together on my Electronica record, then he died and left me some material. I used less of it than I thought, but without it the project would never have happened. Pierre Henry is a ghost on the record. I betrayed him enough. to make him happy ".

Did the absence of his father influence your way of thinking about music? After all, absence forms a space to be filled.
"Probably I started creating to occupy that space of pain, and doing things antithetical to his. I was angry with him. He had left my mother alone. At night I feared something would happen to her, so we became protective of each other. the other. Not a couple, but a duo. But that's the way it goes. Life puts cards in your hand and you play them with the rules you give yourself. Now that I think about it, my father's absence also has positive sides " .
123151301-0380222e-f9b5-43ed-aa6c-270605ce0918.jpg
With his father Maurice, three-time Oscar-winning composer (Getty Images)
(note from me: wrong, this is Francis Dreyfus :-D)

Which?
"It allowed me to find my breath as an artist. Growing up in the shadow of someone so great would have inhibited, held back, or created problems. The same ones my children have. Especially the youngest, David, who is a magician. . It took time to find harmony with the public figure of mine and his mother Charlotte (Rampling, his ex-wife ed) ".

When he started, electronics seemed like a ramp to the cosmos. What was the future imagined as a young man?
"In the '60s and' 70s we had a positive vision of it. For us, the 2000s would have been perfect, in terms of opportunities and social justice. Then it crashed. I hope again with the metaverse. It can be sustainable, and we will survive the twenty-first century only if we establish harmony between ecology and technology. And if we no longer separate culture and technology. New dizziness will arise from young people, I am optimistic ".

However, Oxymore's electronics are sometimes dark, more material and dystopian than cosmic.
"Each track teleports into a different atmosphere, in a neighborhood of the metropolis of Oxyville. There are also gardens, but the piece Brutalism, for example, is linked to the apocalyptic zone, to the big bang of techno after the fall of the Berlin wall, in the rubble of chaos. It sounds like a World War II bunker. "

His mother France Pejot was in the French Resistance. Lyon named a street after her.
"She was taken by the Nazis and deported to a concentration camp. She escaped three times. She shared her experience to testify, to prevent it from happening again, but she didn't tell me too much about it. A little to protect me from the horrors, a little out of humility. . She thought she had done only the right thing, but for me she is a heroine. Look what a normal mother has managed to do. "

What teaching did she leave you?
"Never confuse the Nazis with the Germans, the ideology with the people. When they invited me to play in places where freedom was not guaranteed, it was she who pushed me: you have to go otherwise collaborate in the alienation of that people, in their radicalization, and is punished twice ".

Is that why you accepted live shows in Moscow, China and Saudi Arabia?
"Of course, I don't believe in boycotts. Culture is a Trojan horse. Broaden your mind, pacify souls. I would also go to Korea, Iran, without being complicit in dictatorships. If anything, close to those who suffer from them."

In 1981 you were the first Western artist in China after Mao. What memory does she have?
"Like being on the moon. The country wanted to show that it was open to the rest of the world but the technology was inadequate. We needed equipment and Bernardo Bertolucci, who was shooting The Last Emperor in the Forbidden City, lent it to us. He too was in trouble. He gave it to us. the power generators, we gave them some lights. You wouldn't think so, but behind my great shows, there was often the Latin art of getting by ".

Even in Egypt? On December 31, 1999, he took The 12 Dreams of the Sun between the pyramids.
"Worse than in China. My group worked for months in the desert, inventing solutions. President Mubarak said to me: Extraordinary the show, and even more extraordinary that he managed to do it in my country: but how did he do it?".

That's how? They were crazy feats.
"In the beginning, believe me, it was out of necessity. Seeing a guy at the synthesized and on stage for two hours was not at all exciting. means of my time: lasers, videos, lights. As you can see, limits are resources ".

Oxygène, in effect, composed it with a broken mellotron.
"Exactly. And even earlier, when my grandfather gave me a tape recorder, I stumbled upon certain sounds wrongly, sending them backwards. Then as a boy I was obsessed with the warmth of American records. Where did it come from? In Europe, fine electronics came out, I discovered that we, impoverished by the war, had different cables and voltages. From this limit, a unique sound was generated. The narrow grid in which you have to move, activates the imagination. French and Italians know something. "like Cinecittà compared to Hollywood. Take Fellini. He never knew when he would have the money to finish his films and how he fared is history of cinema".

Did you meet him?
"He told me two fundamental things. First of all:" Jean Michel, I thought I was making different films but, if I look back, I realize that I have always done the same ". It is true for every artist. A career is the declination of the same obsession".

The second thing?
"He told me:" I prefer to create the false sea, with the towels and the fans, because it represents my idea of ​​the sea. "For me it is the same. I prefer to recreate the sound of the wind, rather than record it. It is more poetic".

Is it true that Fellini asked you to compose for a film of him?
"Yes, Nino Rota had recently died and I refused, because they were an untouchable couple. I consider Rota a Beethoven of our times".

What limits has the metaverse 'given' to you?
"We are still in its Middle Ages, the graphics are childish, squared, it looks like Lego. I sharpened my wits and created a constructivist Oxyville, Bauhaus type, in black and white, halfway between Metropolis and Sin City. It seems the aesthetic choice of those who it has many possibilities, and it is the opposite ".

Careful that Zuckerberg doesn't steal the idea.
"We Latins are the ones used to getting by with what is there! Joking aside, it is urgent to create a European metaverse, a cloud that makes us independent from Asia or American soft power. Today, to use virtual reality, we have to turn to their distribution platforms, pay a lot. Tomorrow they could even censor for ideological reasons or colonize us digitally. We need the means to defend and promote our worldview ".

Isn't virtual reality an escape, a way to take even less interest in what surrounds us?
"It depends on how we use it. I don't see it as an abandonment of reality, but as an extension of it. Like the book, which was perhaps the first virtual reality object in history. And then it will help creatives."

How?
"It is a democratization for those who are geographically cut off or have disabilities. Furthermore, the metaverse is an opportunity to get back into possession of our works. Intellectual property has disappeared with the free offer. Producers, composers, arrangers, on digital platforms do not come Not even mentioned. Everyone gets money on music, except those who create it. The system needs to be changed, it's my battle. "

Can you give me your definition of music?
"For me it falls into the category of addictions. It is an unsatisfied search, a mirage you tend to without ever reaching it. What you have in your head and what comes out are two parallel lines that you try to converge. The oxymoron par excellence".

On the Friday of October 7, 2022
Post Posted Fri Oct 07, 2022 5:44 pm
Dr_Jones


User avatar
Posts: 3206
Location: Leiden, Netherlands
Likes given: 109
Likes received  : 208

Original italian article:

Jean-Michel Jarre: la speranza è il metaverso
di Simona Orlando
Jean-Michel Jarre (74 anni) (Anthony Ghnassia)
Jean-Michel Jarre (74 anni) (Anthony Ghnassia)
Siamo andati a Londra per incontrare il pioniere dell'elettronica e ascoltare il suo nuovo disco: "Negli anni 60 pensavamo che il 2000 avrebbe portato opportunità e giustizia. un'idea poi naufragata". In futuro andrà meglio? "Sì, sempre grazie all'hi-tech"
07 Ottobre 2022
Aggiornato alle 11:01 7 minuti di lettura

LONDRA. La solennità ha i suoi tratti grotteschi. La bara della Regina è arrivata in città. I tassisti comunicano via radio gli spostamenti della salma: è di qua, no di là. Tentano la direzione opposta per smarcarsi dall'ingorgo senza fine.

Jean Michel Jarre, intanto, attende agli studi L-Acoustics, per far ascoltare al massimo della qualità il suo 22° album, Oxymore, fuori il 21 ottobre (Sony). Per una volta, non è lui a radunare maree umane da guinness dei primati. Il recente livestream Welcome to the Other Side, all'interno di una Notre-Dame virtuale, ha fatto 75 milioni di spettatori. Dal vivo, nel 1979 a Parigi, fece un milione di persone; uno e mezzo a Houston nel 1986; tre e mezzo a Mosca nel 1997.

Primo ossimoro per uno che ha trascorso quasi più tempo con le macchine che con gli esseri umani, chiuso in studio a fare il cacciatore di suoni, sviluppando un paralinguaggio come chi vive con le balene. Lo definiscono un totem dell'elettronica, un monumento, in realtà è un'installazione mobile, piazzata sempre un passo avanti.

(M.Kuenster Monsterpics)
(M.Kuenster Monsterpics)

A 75 anni, con 85 milioni di dischi venduti, ha la stessa mente curiosa di quando da piccolo, a Lione, calava il microfono in strada per registrare il chiasso dei soldati e dei jukebox, gli echi del treno, del circo lontano, e tutti gli accidenti sonori possibili. Al dna non si comanda. Il nonno André era oboista e inventore di uno dei primi mixer per la radio, il padre Maurice un compositore da Oscar (li vinse per Passaggio in India, Il Dottor Zivago, Lawrence d'Arabia), che però mollò presto la famiglia.

Jeans, giubbetto e occhiali scuri, Jarre è esaltato per il progetto che lega passato e futuro dell'elettronica. Va dalla genesi dell'elettroacustica - il tributo al mentore Pierre Henry, al movimento di musique concrète, e a quella coreografia di suoni non codificati - al nuovo orizzonte sonoro: il binaurale multicanale e 3D usato per la prima pubblicazione commerciale del genere. Con le cuffie, Oxymore è un'opera immersiva dove l'ascoltatore sta al centro, accerchiato da suoni che camminano sulla nuca come formiche. "Non è solo un'esperienza di ascolto nuova, per tutti, non per sofisticati e privilegiati" spiega "È proprio un altro modo di comporre, mettendo oggetti sonori nello spazio".

Non bastasse, le tracce hanno remix (anche by Martin Gore e Brian Eno) e si animano a Oxyville: "Una metropoli virtuale della musica dove fare concerti, invitare artisti e tenere masterclass". Ci suonerà in formato avatar. Oxymore è più vicino allo sperimentale Zoolook del 1984 che a quel Oxygène del 1976 che con 12 milioni di copie vendute portò l'elettronica al grande pubblico, e dal vivo stampò la matrice dei rave "Ma esattamente come allora" assicura Jarre "siamo all'inizio di un movimento".

Cosa sta cambiando?
"È finita l'era in stereo, che è un'illusione, una finzione per creare il senso di spazio. In natura noi sentiamo a 360°, i rumori ci arrivano di fianco, alle spalle. Il sistema binaurale ci restituisce questa tridimensionalità. A rafforzarlo c'è la realtà virtuale, più vicina alla musica che al videogioco perché il primo senso coinvolto non è la vista. È l'udito a percepire l'immersione totale".

Perché la necessità di fissare le tappe della musica elettronica proprio oggi?
"Nel disco omaggio l'approccio europeo alla musica moderna e consegno questa grammatica alla nuova generazione. La musica elettronica non ha niente a che fare con l'America del jazz, blues o rock. E non è nata a Detroit come adesso molti pensano, ma nel nostro continente, anche in Italia, con L'arte dei Rumori di Luigi Russolo, una specie di scrittore di fantascienza in musica. E in Francia, a fine anni '40, con il Groupe de Recherches Musicales di Pierre Schaeffer e Pierre Henry. Sono i primi dj della storia. I campionamenti di oggi, il sound design, derivano da loro. Seminali, e purtroppo non popolari quanto John Cage".

L'album è stato concepito a Radio France, dove li incontrò nel 1968. Come ci arrivò?
"Studiai musica classica, militai in una rock band, poi fui folgorato da questi fabbri alchimisti che concepivano la musica non come note ma come suoni. La differenza fra rumore e musica stava nell'intenzione del compositore, nelle sue mani. Mescolavano elementi che apparentemente non hanno a che fare l'uno con l'altro, il suono della pioggia con un clarinetto. Il silenzio? Rilevante quanto il resto. Erano surrealisti, provocatori, iconoclasti. Diventai anche io un dirottatore".

Lei fra gli avanguardisti era considerato pop?
"Sono stato sempre in una situazione schizofrenica. Non ero intellettuale come gli altri. La sperimentazione pura per me era troppo cerebrale. Io amo la melodia, l'elemento sensuale, la condivisione, perciò mi sono posto come un ponte fra sperimentazione e cultura pop. Eppure Oxigène non poteva certo definirsi commerciale".

Dovette suonare alieno nel 1976.
"Nessuno voleva pubblicarlo. Dicevano: non ha ritmo, non c'è voce, in più sei francese. Quando uscì, la gente rimandava indietro il vinile, si lamentava dei rumori, dei difetti di fabbrica. Oggi è un classico. Avanguardia è il nome che diamo a ciò che trent'anni dopo sarà popolare".

Oxymore lo definirebbe un disco pop?
"Nel senso che è un'esperienza sonora che possono fare tutti. Ci sono brani ballabili, parti delicate, altre violente, e poi, chiaro, fedeltà alle mie radici sperimentali. Ad esempio, un giorno avevo la finestra aperta e dal nulla è spuntato il suono di un batterista jazz che provava a distanza, perso nello spazio. L'ho catturato e messo dentro".

Come una polaroid. D'altra parte per Henry la musica concreta era più vicina alla fotografia che alla musica. Paragonava il suo mestiere a quello di un monaco. Concorda?
"I musicisti condividono il palco, hanno accanto un'orchestra, ma il compositore è solitario, somiglia più a un pittore, a uno scrittore. Lo studio è un atelier dove ricava suoni e li modella come uno scultore fa con la pietra".

La copertina di Oxymore: uscirà con Sony il 21 ottobre in cd, vinile, digitale, in stereo e in audio binaurale
La copertina di Oxymore: uscirà con Sony il 21 ottobre in cd, vinile, digitale, in stereo e in audio binaurale

In due brani c'è la voce, il respiro del suo mentore. Quanto è presente?
"Dovevamo lavorare insieme nel mio disco Electronica, poi lui è morto e mi ha lasciato del materiale. Ne ho usato meno di quanto pensassi, ma senza non sarebbe mai nato il progetto. Pierre Henry è un fantasma nel disco. L'ho tradito abbastanza da renderlo felice".

L'assenza di suo padre ha influenzato il suo modo di pensare la musica? In fondo, l'assenza forma uno spazio da riempire.
"Probabile che io abbia iniziato a creare per occupare quello spazio di dolore, e facendo cose antitetiche alle sue. Ero arrabbiato con lui. Aveva lasciato da sola mia madre. La notte temevo che le accadesse qualcosa, così siamo diventati protettivi l'uno con l'altra. Non una coppia, ma un duo. Ma va così. La vita ti mette delle carte in mano e le giochi con le regole che ti dai. Ora che ci penso, l'assenza di mio padre ha anche lati positivi".

Con il padre Maurice, compositore tre volte premio Oscar (Getty Images)
Con il padre Maurice, compositore tre volte premio Oscar (Getty Images)

Quali?
"Mi ha permesso di trovare il mio respiro come artista. Crescere all'ombra di uno così grande, mi avrebbe inibito, frenato, o creato problemi. Gli stessi che hanno i miei figli. Soprattutto il più piccolo, David, che fa il mago. Ha impiegato tempo per trovare armonia con la figura pubblica mia e di sua madre Charlotte (Rampling, sua ex moglie ndr)".

Quando iniziò, l'elettronica sembrava una rampa per il cosmo. Com'era il futuro immaginato da giovane?
"Negli anni '60 e '70 ne avevamo una visione positiva. Per noi il Duemila sarebbe stato perfetto, in termini di opportunità e giustizia sociale. Poi è naufragata. Torno a sperare con il metaverso. Può essere sostenibile, e noi sopravviveremo al ventunesimo secolo solo se stabiliamo armonia fra ecologia e tecnologia. E se non separiamo più cultura e tecnologia. Nasceranno nuove vertigini dai giovani, sono ottimista".

L'elettronica di Oxymore talvolta però è cupa, più materica e distopica che cosmica.
"Ogni traccia telestrasporta in un'atmosfera diversa, in un quartiere della metropoli di Oxyville. Ci sono anche giardini, ma il pezzo Brutalism, ad esempio, è legato alla zona apocalittica, al big bang della techno dopo la caduta del muro di Berlino, tra le macerie del caos. Suona come in un bunker della seconda guerra mondiale".

Sua madre France Pejot fu nella Resistenza francese. Lione le ha intitolato una strada.
"Venne presa dai nazisti e deportata in campo di concentramento. Scappò tre volte. Condivideva la sua esperienza per testimoniare, per evitare che accadesse di nuovo, ma non me ne parlava troppo. Un po' per proteggermi dagli orrori, un po' per umiltà. Pensava di aver fatto solo la cosa giusta, invece per me è un'eroina. Guardi cos'è riuscita a fare una normalissima mamma".

Che insegnamento le ha lasciato?
"Mai confondere i nazisti con i tedeschi, l'ideologia con le persone. Quando mi invitavano a suonare in luoghi dove la libertà non era garantita, era lei a spingermi: devi andare sennò collabori all'alienazione di quel popolo, alla sua radicalizzazione, e viene punito due volte".

Per questo accettò i live a Mosca, in Cina e Arabia Saudita?
"Certo, non credo ai boicottaggi. La cultura è un cavallo di Troia. Allarga la mente, pacifica le anime. Andrei anche in Corea, in Iran, senza per questo essere complice delle dittature. Semmai, vicino a chi le subisce".

Nel 1981 fu il primo artista occidentale in Cina dopo Mao. Che ricordo ha?
"Come stare sulla luna. Il Paese voleva dimostrare di aprirsi al resto del mondo ma la tecnologia era inadeguata. Avevamo bisogno di attrezzature e ce le prestò Bernardo Bertolucci, che girava L'ultimo imperatore nella Città Proibita. Anche lui in difficoltà. Ci diede i generatori di corrente, noi gli cedemmo delle luci. Non si direbbe, ma dietro i miei grandi show, c'è stata spesso l'arte latina di arrangiarsi".

Anche in Egitto? Il 31 dicembre 1999 portò The 12 Dreams of the Sun tra le piramidi.
"Peggio che in Cina. Il mio gruppo lavorò per mesi nel deserto, inventando soluzioni. Il Presidente Mubarak mi disse: Straordinario lo spettacolo, e ancora più straordinario che sia riuscito a farlo nel mio paese: ma come ha fatto?".

Ecco, come? Sono state imprese folli.
"All'inizio, mi creda, fu per necessità. Vedere un tizio al sintetizzatoe sul palco per due ore non era affatto avvincente. Pensai all'opera, ai compositori classici che per intrattenere la platea si dotavano di scenografie e fondali, allora usai i mezzi del mio tempo: laser, video, luci. Come vede, i limiti sono risorse".

Oxygène, in effetti, lo compose con un mellotron rotto.
"Esatto. E ancora prima, quando mio nonno mi regalò un registratore, incappai in certi suoni sbagliando, mandandoli al contrario. Poi da ragazzo ero fissato con il calore dei dischi americani. Da dove veniva? In Europa ci usciva un'elettronica fina, fredda. Scoprii che noi, impoveriti dalla guerra, avevamo cavi e voltaggi diversi. Da questo limite, si generò un suono unico. La griglia ristretta in cui ti devi muovere, attiva l'immaginazione. Francesi e italiani ne sanno qualcosa. È un po' come Cinecittà rispetto a Hollywood. Prendi Fellini. Non sapeva mai quando avrebbe avuto i soldi per finire i suoi film e come se la cavò è storia del cinema".

Lo incontrò?
"Mi disse due cose fondamentali. Innanzitutto: "Jean Michel, pensavo di fare film diversi ma, se guardo indietro, mi accorgo di aver fatto sempre lo stesso". È vero per ogni artista. Una carriera è la declinazione della stessa ossessione".

La seconda cosa?
"Mi disse: "Preferisco creare il mare falso, con i teli e i ventilatori, perché rappresenta la mia idea di mare". Per me vale lo stesso. Preferisco ricreare il suono del vento, piuttosto che registrarlo. È più poetico".

Vero che Fellini le chiese di comporre per un suo film?
"Sì, era morto da poco Nino Rota e rifiutai, perché si trattava di una coppia intoccabile. Considero Rota un Beethoven dei nostri tempi".

Quali limiti le ha 'regalato' il metaverso?
"Siamo ancora nel suo Medioevo, la grafica è infantile, squadrata, sembra Lego. Ho aguzzato l'ingegno e creato una Oxyville costruttivista, tipo Bauhaus, in bianco e nero, a metà fra Metropolis e Sin City. Sembra la scelta estetica di chi ha tante possibilità, ed è il contrario".

Attento che Zuckerberg non le rubi l'idea.
"Siamo noi latini quelli abituati a cavarsela con quel che c'è! A parte gli scherzi, è urgente creare un metaverso europeo, un cloud che ci renda indipendenti dall'Asia o dal soft power americano. Oggi, per usare la realtà virtuale, dobbiamo rivolgerci alle loro piattaforme di distribuzione, pagare molto. Domani potrebbero anche censurare per motivi ideologici o colonizzarci digitalmente. Servono i mezzi per difendere e promuovere la nostra visione del mondo".

La realtà virtuale non è una fuga, un modo per interessarsi ancora meno a ciò che ci circonda?
"Dipende da come la usiamo. Io non lo vedo un abbandono della realtà, ma una sua estensione. Come il libro, che è stato forse il primo oggetto di realtà virtuale della storia. E poi aiuterà i creativi".

In che modo?
"È una democratizzazione per chi è tagliato fuori geograficamente o ha disabilità. Inoltre, il metaverso è l'occasione per tornare in possesso delle nostre opere. La proprietà intellettuale è sparita con la gratuità. Produttori, compositori, arrangiatori, sulle piattaforme digitali non vengono neppure menzionati. Sulla musica incassano soldi tutti, tranne chi la crea. Va cambiato il sistema, è una mia battaglia".

Mi dà una sua definizione di musica?
"Per me rientra nella categoria delle dipendenze. È una ricerca insoddisfatta, un miraggio cui tendi senza mai raggiungerlo. Ciò che hai in testa e ciò che esce fuori, sono due rette parallele che cerchi di far convergere. L'ossimoro per eccellenza".

Sul Venerdì del 7 ottobre 2022
Post Posted Fri Oct 07, 2022 6:47 pm
Finaero


User avatar
Posts: 2879
Location: Finland
Likes given: 123
Likes received  : 39

Dr_Jones wrote: Fri Oct 07, 2022 5:43 pm 123151301-0380222e-f9b5-43ed-aa6c-270605ce0918.jpg
With his father Maurice, three-time Oscar-winning composer (Getty Images)
(note from me: wrong, this is Francis Dreyfus :-D)
... now that's quality control. :shock:
Post Posted Sun Oct 09, 2022 7:33 am
Kanta
English Moderator & Miss News

User avatar
Posts: 10473
Location: United Kingdom
Likes given: 33
Likes received  : 105

Image

"Oxymore": Jean-Michel Jarre on the challenges of 3D audio

s’t spoke to the music pioneer Jean-Michel Jarre on the occasion of his new album "Oxymore", one of the largest audio productions in 3D to date.

Source: https://timetotimes.com/oxymore-jean-mi ... dio/?amp=1
Jarregirl YouTube
Concerts attended:
Théâtre Marigny, Paris - 2007
Symphony Hall, Birmingham - 2008
RAH, London - 2008
Wembley Arena, London - 2009
NIA, Birmingham - 2009
POP Bercy, Paris - 2010
NIA, Birmingham - 2010
O2 Arena, London - 2010
Zénith Aréna, Lille - 2010
Port Hercule, Monaco - 2011
TUI Arena, Hannover - 2011
Festival International de Carthage - 2013
Barclaycard Arena, Birmingham - 2016
Post Posted Sun Oct 09, 2022 10:19 am
Dr_Jones


User avatar
Posts: 3206
Location: Leiden, Netherlands
Likes given: 109
Likes received  : 208

That's a great read. Both these interviews don't have too much PR speak and especially the last one goes very much into the technical details of 3D recording. One could argue that that's the PR speak but I genuinely think JMJ is really into this.
Some interesting quotes:
We released a test version of my “Oxygene” album in 360 Real Audio and it didn’t sound very good at all. It’s a secret. I spoke to Fraunhofer about this, but we don’t know why. You definitely need to improve this.
This is most probably a different thing than the 2007 5.1 mix.
I’m not a fan of converting stereo recordings to 3D. It just doesn’t work. However, the industry believes that they can convert the old catalog of stereo albums to 3D. But this is a big mistake. From a creative point of view, you have to come up with music for this new medium from the very beginning. There’s no need to remix Frank Sinatra in 3D to get his voice spinning in your head. Nobody cares.
So the chances of JMJ re-releasing his albums in 3D sound are slim. Maybe his experiences with the aforementioned Oxygene 3D sound recording led to this insight.
Post Posted Sun Oct 09, 2022 2:33 pm
Jote


User avatar
Posts: 975
Location: Lodz, Poland
Likes given: 37
Likes received  : 53

Dr_Jones wrote: Sun Oct 09, 2022 10:19 am This is most probably a different thing than the 2007 5.1 mix.
Or Planet Jarre 5.1 mixes for that matter which are done the same way (stereo upmix, unless I missed something very subtle). WTTOS has a true 5.1 (5.0?) mix though.
Post Posted Sun Oct 09, 2022 7:00 pm
Dr_Jones


User avatar
Posts: 3206
Location: Leiden, Netherlands
Likes given: 109
Likes received  : 208

Oh yeah, some of the Planet Jarre tracks do work in 5.1 though, I kinda enjoy listening to them. Although I skip Equinoxe 5 usually, that one totally missed the mark.

I'm not sure about the Electronica tracks though, weren't some recorded in some kind of 3D stereo way?
Post Posted Sun Oct 09, 2022 10:12 pm
shadow


User avatar
Posts: 1436
Likes received  : 21

Oh man... Can you imagine a true 5.1 mix of Ethnicolor if they bothered getting all the layers and making a brand new mix from the ground up...

How I wish :(
27-11-10: Ahoy Rotterdam
22-11-16: Heineken Music Hall Amsterdam







  • 2020 Zoolook.nl
    Powered by phpBB forum software